Feminism

Apr13

Sunday Specials: American Bloggers and Stories that Matter

*Sunday Specials are a weekly round-up of happenings on the web-o-sphere. So enjoy your coffee while checking out what’s caught our attention. 

Happy Sunday Specials Friendlies! I am taking advantage of the potential to be snowed in today and soaking up some much needed recuperation time with this lovely family of mine…but before I get to the business of movies and manicures, I wanted to share my weekly round-up with all of you.

American Bloggers

There was a lot of buzz this week amongst those who identify themselves as bloggers in the good old US of A regarding this particular soon-to-be-released documentary.

American Blogger Official Trailer from Chris Wiegand on Vimeo.

Most of the push-back was about the apparent lack of true diversity reflected in this trailer.

The trailer alternates between interviews with bloggers and Tererence Malik-esque landscapes, because nothing says “blogging”—but also “America”—like the Grand Canyon and wheat fields. While the trailer can put you in something of a trance, you might notice there’s a certain consistency to its subjects: It just so happens that all of the bloggers—those featured in the trailer, at least—are remarkably well-dressed and attractive white women (with one minority being the exception) who ask themselves questions like “What is a blog?” and say things like, “I think the human experience in general is interesting to people.” ~Brendan O’Connor

The wife of the filmmaker, Casey Wiegand (the blogger who inspired this documentary in the first place) provided a lengthy heartfelt response to the criticism on her blog this week as well.

 The way these women tell their stories authentically does represent American Bloggers, but we are completely aware that not all categories of American Bloggers are represented in this film. Nor was that the goal for this first film. You can read this post from almost a year ago. Read the idea, the thought behind it. See where I mention American Blogger Part 2? From the beginning this was the start of a much bigger conversation. So many stories to be told. ~Casey Wiegand

 What a Woman Is Worth

womanisworth

Lunardo reflects on how this book came about on A Deeper Story this week. So excited to add this book to my library!

I was 15– Too young and too scared, desperate to keep my older boyfriend, reluctantly willing. He gave me a magazine as a guide, full of bodies and skin, excitement and impossibility. He wanted me to learn what to do for him. So I did. And when he used me all up, he left me to guilt and self-loathing. And I dared not seek comfort where it had not met me before. ~Tamara Lunardo

 Story Matters: Sarah James

I am reminded on a daily basis that our stories matter. They are the data that mold and shape our style of relating in the larger context of our worlds. In her post Going Forward, Sarah James (blogger at Whoorl) opened up about how the last year or so has transformed who she is and how she lives in this world. I love witnessing the courage of women willing to let others learn from their own experience.

 If you even knew how long I’ve been dragging my feet in regards to this post, you all. It’s been sitting in my draft folder, title only, for months. It’s just so hard to write about, you know,  LIFE…Although my health struggles are specific to me, the thoughts and feelings and experiences I’ve dealt with during this period are universal. We all hit bumps in the road – trauma, illness, divorce, death of loved ones, anxiety, depression, I mean, the list goes on and on, right? We’ve all been in the depths at some point, some of us early on, and some of us lucky enough to sail calm waters for decades before the proverbial shit hits the fan. (That was me. I made it 38 years, folks! Cue fanfare!) ~Sarah James

So that’s what caught my attention this week folks. Leave a comment and tell us what caught your attention!

Mar30

Sunday Specials: World Vision Waffle and Some Voices of Wisdom

*Sunday Specials are a weekly round-up of happenings on the web-o-sphere. So enjoy your coffee while checking out what’s caught our attention. 

World Vision Waffle

On Monday evening this past week I learned of World Vision’s initial decision to modify their employee policy to allow for the elligiblity of  Christians involved in a same-sex marriage to become part of the organization’s staff. Twitterverse was all energized around this particular issue. I witnessed celebration and hope as well as disdain and fear bleeding from tweet after tweet. I personally felt like I was witnessing a shift in Christian culture that restored my own sense of hope for the future of evangelicalism. This clearly divisive decision by World Vision was short-lived as they reversed their policy change by Wednesday. Though I am not ready at this point to expound theologically or psychologically or philosophically on my views of homosexuality, I will say that despite World Visions inability to live into their initial decision, I am still gut-wrenchingly hopeful that the voices of love will continue to revolutionize this relationally broken and busted-up world we live in. I have included some of the reflections on this decision that have sustained this hope below for your own explorations:

Michael Hidalgo – WORLD VISION: SOME QUESTIONS FOR ALL OF US
Kristen Howerton – WORLD VISION, THE REVERSAL OF INCLUSION, AND THE AFTERMATH
David Creech – YAY WORLD VISION
David Henson – I DON’T BLAME WORLD VISION. I BLAME HOMOPHOBIA AND HATE. 

 

One Man’s Story: Jesus is Better than You Imagined by Jonathan Merrit

The timeliness of this post from Jonathan Merrit goes without question. If you read nothing else this morning, please READ THIS undeniably honest reflection of this man’s journey through shame.

Jonathan Merrit – A THREAD CALLED GRACE

Did the childhood abuse shape my adolescent and young adult experiences, or were those parts of me already there? I’m certain I don’t know the answer to this question, and I’m not sure anyone does except God. ~ Jonathan Merrit

Voices of Wisdom

It is because of the voices of those I consider wise that I maintain a sense of hope. This week some of those voices consisted of Rachel Held Evans, Tony Jones, Jonathan Merrit and Sarah Bessey. Bessey’s post on leaving evangelicalism spoke to my heart this week so I thought I’d share it here.

Sarah Bessey – IN WHICH THIS IS FOR THE ONES LEAVING EVANGELICALISM

My friend, don’t stay in a religious institution or a religious tradition out of fear. Fear should not drive your decisions: let love motivate you. Lean into your questions and your doubts until you find that God is out here in the wilderness, too. ~Sarah Bessey

 

Malala’s Father: A Voice for Equality

In many patriarchal societies and tribal societies, fathers are usually known by their sons, but I am one of the few fathers who is known by his daughter and I am proud of it. ~Ziauddin Yousafzai

What caught your attention this week…or better yet, what broke your heart or inspired hope?