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Sep29

#SundaySpecials on Monday

Hello lovely ones. I’m a little out of rhythm here, so a little grace is very much appreciated. I’m also trying to ponder these #SundaySpecial posts and am thinking they may serve better as an end of the month round up of the most interesting topics I find myself still circling around. I’ll keep considering, but in the mean time, here are quite a few articles about quite a few heavy topics. Dig in if you’re intrigued…

This is What Brave Means by Glennon Doyle Melton

We have to teach our children (and ourselves) that caution is often a sign of courage. That often NO is as brave an answer as YES. Because the little girl who says no in the face of pressure to pierce her ears or jump off a cliff might become a bigger girl who says no in the face of pressure to bong a beer or bully a peer.  Whether her answer is YES OR NO- give me a little girl who goes against the grain, who pleases her own internal voice before pleasing others. Give me that girl so I can call her BRAVE loudly and proudly in front of the whole world. Give me a girl who has the wisdom to listen to her OWN voice and the courage to SPEAK IT OUT LOUD. Even if it disappoints others. Especially then.

Justice then Reconciliation by Austin Channing Brown

Reconciliation requires far more than hugs, small talk, and coffee dates. Being nice is well… nice, but it is not reconciliation. Reconciliation is what we do as we listen to hard truths from the marginalized among us. As our friends point out how troubling our words have been, how hurtful our actions have been, it’s our reaction that determines whether or not we are practicing reconciliation. Drinking in the words. Sitting in the pain. Committing to understanding. Committing to doing better. Desiring the hard truths because they lead to growth. These are the sign posts on the path of reconciliation. It’s spending time in each other’s spaces- physical space, head space, heart space. And it’s creating shared spaces where both can breathe freely.

War Is Not the Answer by Jim Wallis

I have always believed that any alternative to war must still address the very real problems at hand — just in a more effective way. To say that “war is not the answer” is not only a moral statement but also is a serious critique of what doesn’t work; wars often fail to solve the problems and ultimately make them worse. War has to answer to metrics, just as more peaceful alternatives do. The war in Iraq was a complete failure with enormous human and financial costs; ISIS is now one of the consequences.

Why Are So Many Women Dying From Ebola by Lauren Wolfe

Ebola spreads through contact with blood and other bodily fluids, and in Liberia, as in neighboring countries, women are usually the primary caregivers for the sick. They continue to be during the current epidemic — they stay in their homes and become infected by their children or husbands instead of seeking out doctors and nurses for their loved ones. Rarely are the roles reversed. ‘If a man is sick, the woman can easily bathe him but the man cannot do so,’ says Marpue Spear, the executive director of the Women’s NGO Secretariat of Liberia (WONGOSOL). ‘Traditionally, women will take care of the men as compared to them taking care of the women.’

Science Shows Something Surprising About People Who Love to Write by Rachel Grate

By writing about traumatic, stressful or emotional events, participants were significantly more likely to have fewer illnesses and be less affected by trauma. Participants ultimately spent less time in the hospital, enjoyed lower blood pressure and had better liver functionality than their counterparts.

 

 

So what caught your attention around the web this month? Feel free to leave a few words, links or funny photos in the comments!

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